‘Science’

The role of infectious zoonotic diseases as a connecting element for the Sustainable Development Goals

Someone once asked me, “Isn’t sustainable development an oxymoron?” Now, before you are filled to the brim with contempt for this person, it was only a half-serious but quite valid question with a point to be made. The way that we define and practice sustainable development would be very important to know and understand first to be able to tackle this question. And in any… Read More

Some thoughts on performance, performativity and subjectivity

Within the discussion of performance and performativity, geographers have an unusual task of combining social processes with spatial contexts. The paper by Nicky Gregson and Gillian Rose (check out her blog on visual culture!) (2000) tackle this in their research activities as well as in their action of writing the paper. The authors argue that spaces are also performative and bring space into the discussion… Read More

Academic dependency, and is Yale-NUS and Duke-NUS proof of it in Singapore?

As an aspiring scholar, it is imperative to open your mind to concepts and ideas from a range of sources. However, academic dependency may be an undermining force that influences academic creativity and should be of interest to anyone of any discipline. Although Syed Farid Alatas discusses this in a specific context in his paper “Academic Dependency and the Global Division of Labor in the… Read More

It’s ok to be “Quiet” (Book Review)

The extrovert ideal. If you live in the USA, you know what this is. This means speaking up in class, volunteering to be the leader, always being talkative, avoiding “awkward silence,” and generally showing people that you are outgoing. Susan Cain discusses in her book “Quiet” how “extroversion is an enormously appealing personality style, but we’ve turned it into an oppressive standard to which most… Read More

‘Bad Science’ infographic

We keep hearing more and more cases where ‘bad science’ gets uncovered. Here is a really cool infographic by the folks at Clinical Psychology. It goes along with some things I mentioned in a post about the role of ignorance in science. All of the incentives seem to be setting the system up for biased work, and the pressure to produce papers endlessly isn’t helping.